43 Crazy Things About Writers

4 April 2021 Leave a comment

I don’t get celebrities and their crazy ways. A lot of these quirks are from older writers, so maybe it’s just different times now?

Regardless, it’s easy for us to sit back and read about an author and shake our heads while our lives are probably just as bizarre and belong in the kid’s book, Wacky Wednesday.

No I don’t know why there are 43 when it clearly states 42?!?!

Check out the link below to see what factinate.com has to offer: https://www.worldwriterscollective.com

“From quirky writing processes to metaphysical hobbies, writers are complex, intellectual creatures who draw inspiration from the depths of their vivid imagination. They straddle multiple worlds, sometimes living a colourful, flamboyant life, and at other times existing in isolation and poverty. Here are 42 insights into the multi-faceted lives of famous writers.”

Categories: Writing Groups

Writers Sauce – WWC – MWS 1-April-2021

2 April 2021 Leave a comment

Writers Sauce – WWC – MWS 1April-2021

Welcome to Writers Sauce. We have four new topics for you to check out. See CONTENTS below.

Ariel, Jayne, Bethany, Thyagarajulu, Jarryd, Natalie and Luke are our our newest subscribers. We now have 301 subscribers. You’ve joined a great group of writers 🙂

If anyone would like to invite friends to join us, just forward on this email to anyone anywhere in the world.

We need more members. You will have your own author profile page and special promotions.

https://www.worldwriterscollective.com/wwc

Do you want to add to this email with your own words of wisdom? Well, we want you to as well. Get in touch with anything you think writers would like to know about. We can also/otherwise add info to our NEWS section on the WWC website.

It’s all free and it’s off our own backs’. Please get involved if you have the time.

Thank you,

Mat Clarke

www.worldwriterscollective.com/mat-carke

Contents:

(Look for the *NEW* stamp below for content you haven’t read yet)

1. Book Review (more reviews on books wanted)

*2. Writing competition *NEW*

3. Promote your blog

*4. Creating Real Characters Via Research *NEW*

5. What is a genre?

*6. Melbourne Writers Social Group upcoming events *NEW*

*7. All Write! upcoming events *NEW*

8. We want to hear from you

9. Join us and we’ll promote you

10. Essential Information for Writers

11. Important links

1. Review a book title – It will be posted on the WWC website

READ MORE HERE: www.worldwriterscollective.com/writers-sauce

Are you someone who likes to review books (poems, short stories, movie scripts, blogs, non-fiction, etc.) and give honest feedback on content, interest, characters, structure, or if you think it was just really good reading? Submit your review via this email.

For 2021 please review any book or script or poetry you like (yes, you can submit a review done on your story if you like).

Here’s a review by Magz Morgan of Cecile Ravell’s story: https://ravellc.wixsite.com/ravell-the-writer


‘Coming, Frankwen’. The voice of the three-year-old child calling to her brother and hero, opens Child Magical. Cecile Ravell’s story is a memoir of a childhood in transit, from Brooklyn, New York, to Malta then Melbourne, Australia. 

In a series of poignant and funny cameos, seen through the eyes of a little girl, Ravell brings to life an intimate immigrant tale. The vignettes follow this feisty little girl from moments of triumph, to moments of indignation, as she becomes aware of her position as an outsider in a society that values fair-haired children, and as a girl who plays second fiddle to a family culture that reveres boys.

Child Magical provides valuable insights into the reality of what it feels and looks like, for a girl, growing up; in particular, an immigrant girl.

Read it slowly, savour it in your favourite armchair, or read it quickly on public transport. Either way, Ravell’s story is a good read, piquant and thought-provoking.’

Magz Morgan, author, ‘Motherlands’.

www.magzmorgan.com

2. Current Writing Competition (FREE)

Short story competition – World Writers Collective

Top five to six winners are published in our anthology: https://www.worldwriterscollective.com

A WORLD OF RUSH or anything about rushing – Write 5000 words with this theme in mind.

Become a World Writers Collective member, which helps support everyone in the group as indie writers and allows you to collect prizes if you win.

Want to get published or publish your own works and have our members spread the word about your works, book launch, or other? It’s only $20 a year to join which helps pay the few hundred dollars it costs for the domain and host the website each year.

www.worldwriterscollective.com/writing-competitions

If you are one of the top winners of the competition, you will be included in the 2021 anthology. That’s just one of the great reasons to get involved with the anthology!

We also want to promote you. All you have to do is say the word. 

  • 3. Promote your blog

We want to promote your blog. Email us a link of one of your blogs and an explanation of why WWC people would enjoy reading it.

Here’s one from Mat Clarke:

https://matclarke.blogspot.com/2019/12/roadside-thriller-story.html

It’s an interesting short thriller story written and performed as a podcast by Mat Clarke and directed and produced by Noel Anderson.

  • 4. Creating Real Characters Via Research

You’ve likely looked up how to create believable characters and discovered the research you need to do to get under a character’s skin and see what their motivations are, what makes them afraid, their influences, their life-story and what they eat, etc. However, what if the character you need in your story is so alien to you or anyone you know, there is no way you could get inside of their head. How do military types talk to each other. What do astronauts think about when they stare into the sky? How does an elite athlete sleep at night with muscles so sore they want to cry themselves to sleep?

Some characters require more extensive research.

A main area I was interested in was the police. This was due to writing thrillers and often needing to accurately represent my characters as being in the job for a number of years. Much of this I was able to understand from books, movies and TV shows, but it did not fully put me in the mind of an actual police officer.

I attended Thrillerfest in New York in 2015 and researched a seminar that was going to talk about police, which was the number one session I wanted to see. It entailed the basics of an author and cop talking about the realities of police life (wife and husband team). There were some great points made, such as calling your career, the job. Reason: there is no other ‘real’ job in many police officer’s minds’, so it is called, the job. However, I still did not understand the true mind of a cop. I decided I would go for a ride-along with a cop to better hear the way they talk and interact with civilians. This never came about due to time constraints in the US, but in the end it didn’t matter, because I eventually joined the Police in my home state. It wasn’t just to learn about the way police talk etc., it was actually because as an author, I needed a job/money and this seemed to tick many boxes. I actually work as a Protective Services Officer, which suits me and my age and my preference to not to stay in the police forever. It’s a great job, but without me needing to be in my twenties and start at the bottom and work five million hours a week.

Okay, so what’s the answer for you when you need to get into the mind of a person who works in a career that is totally alien to you?

Research!

I often spend time on blogs to work out how people talk and interact with each other. On one occasion I needed the personality of a 18 year old living in Cleveland to fit one of my characters. I searched online until I found a blog that was open and honest and allowed me to create a character based from this personality, although I also used many others I came across on other blogs too.

Maybe you need to understand a homeless person to realise why they say and do what they do? I wish I could remember the writer who mentioned to me that he had gone and sat with them and chatted with them to understand them. To take it further, you could dress like someone you want to get to know about and sit with them and see how people react to you.

To finish up, here’s physician and best-selling medical thriller novelist Richard Mabry’s take regarding medical doctor research:

-What Type of Medical Scenario Do You Want?

-What do you want to accomplish.

-Compile a list of important dates associated with milestone medical advances so you can write realistically about an accident or illness in a given time period.

-You can submit a question to one of the medical professionals whose blogs supply great answers, which is also listed on this information site.

-And lastly, watch out for sites that have something to sell, whether a procedure, a hospital or physician’s particular expertise, or even a surgical approach.

Website for more insites: https://www.livewritethrive.com/2015/03/09/infusing-medical-details-into-your-fiction/

Notes:

-Get under their skin, afraid, happy, influences, life-story, death.

(Some characters require more extensive research)

-Books, movies, TV shows … show us a lot, but some may not show us what is real.

-Is it real cop talk and the realities they go through?

-Research online. Blogs are best. Mixture of world stats and local crime reports too.

-Create a well rounded character.

-Homeless person or other dress-up. Sit talk with them. Dress the way they do to see how people react to you.

By

Mat Clarke

http://www.worldwriterscollective.com/mat-clarke

READ MORE

  • 5. What is a genre?

From the mind of Mat Clarke.

What is Genre Writing?

Is ’email writing’ a particular genre? If so, then that could mean blogging would be too, right?

Do you find that you often question what genre it is you’re writing and if you can classify yourself as a particular genre writer?

Do you think you’re keeping to the required norms of writing.

Do you mix your writing so it’s part comedy, part romance, part nonfiction and part suspense?

I promise this next question coming up is going to be the last stressy thing about genres. I just hope I haven’t made you want to put these thoughts into the too-hard-basket.

Don’t give up and throw your pen and paper in to the bin and smash your laptop with a hammer. I’m going to help you through this and I promise there’s a rainbow at the end.

Will readers stop reading your stories if you don’t stick to one particular genre while keeping within the standard conventions of that particular genre so your readers know what they are buying each time they pick up your book?

The short answer to that last question is, no, not anymore. This was the convention in the past, but you can now freely write more than one genre as well as mix genres and dabble in sub genres.

If you decide you want to traditionally publish, you’ll need to read the instructions from the agent’s or publisher’s website before you submit. There are many hoops you’ll need to jump through and much information they will want from you. This includes writing a synopsis, classifying your work into a genre, mentioning what authors and titles are close to yours in style or plot or other, and you’ll need to write up general information about you as a writer.

When I first started writing, I did so for fun. I was ten years old and all I wanted to do was write what was entertaining to me.

Is fun a genre?

I didn’t need anyone to read my stories. Instead I enjoyed creating new worlds where I could insert people and creatures into them to explore, create, conflict and interact.

Then came the idea of one day being published. Don’t get me wrong, it was lots of fun writing and not needing to edit. I still enjoy sitting down not knowing how a story will play out. It was just that in 2010 I decided I wanted other people to read my work and for them to actually enjoy it. To do this I needed not only to amuse myself, but to work out what my readers liked too. I also needed to learn how to edit properly. (With both of these, you never stop learning.)

After writing over 70,000 words of my first novel, I decided I needed to explore what genre my story might fit into. I did this by comparing my story to other stories already available from other known authors. I made notes on how my story matched a proposed genre before knowing it was definitely that. I wrote a synopsis and a blurb and compared mine to other published authors to help cement my work and what it was similar to.

I initially thought my writing was general fiction. I shouldn’t have been so boring. I later thought adventure, due to the journey aspect that my main characters often would take. However, I still wasn’t sure. I kept digging and was about to settle on crime (because I often include murder/crime that would be investigated by police), but then I discovered the thriller genre.

Thrillers are often fast paced, have a character that is either pursuing or being pursued and has police investigations, although as a secondary aspect.This fit my general story writing style. Huzzah! I could now call myself a thriller writer.

Enter sub-genres from stage left.

You don’t have to constrain yourself to a particular genre. There are mixed genres and subgenres that allow you to write whatever you like. Yes, your story needs to have a plot, have interesting characters and be edited well, but as for genre, you’re allowed to call yourself a thriller-adventure writer. A romance-comedy writer. A psychological thriller writer. Create your own and be proud to be a comedy-crime writer.

I write blogs and email.

Yes, you can write blogs or emails in a certain specified way, and that could then make it a particular genre. Maybe your job has conformity when writing emails. This is a genre. You write your blog in a comedic way. Guess what, genre writing!

So what does the word genre mean? A class or category having particular form, technique or content.

This is the dictionary definition and really sums it up well. I don’t think we need to dwell on that any further.

I write many different genres. Or I want to try other genres.

Yes, yes, yes! You should.

In years past publishers wanted to be able to classify you as a particular genre writer so they could market you in a certain way.

Then, if you wanted to stray from your specified genre, you would need to have a serious talk with your publisher and maybe even search for a new publisher.

Marketing you is as essential as marketing your book. It’s just that now the marketing angle has changed slightly so it doesn’t have to be all about what genre you write. It can instead be about the interesting stories you bring into the world. It was a subtle change that the readers themselves brought about, and it’s an important one.

As for me, I recently wrote a crime novel even though I am a thriller writer. And that’s ok. I’m trying to offload it onto a publisher as we speak. I’ve also written children’s stories, young adult and adventure.

Now you should go and explore all the genres out there and have fun! Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t write what you want to write (just keep in mind that when a story can be classified more easily into a particular genre, publishers are more interested in publishing your work – new authors only. Established and already published authors have much more freedom).

6. Melbourne Writers Social upcoming events

During the virus outbreak we suspended some of our events, with most returning January 2021. Our monthly Tuesday event is now running again at the Wharf Hotel. Please join us – all are welcome even if you are only thinking of starting out in a creative field.

We meet online every Monday from 6.30pm and show each other our work and chat about everything creative.  https://www.meetup.com/Melbourne-Writers/ Details are on the Meetup.com site.

South Bank Write Now: Second Saturday of the month. The venue is generally quiet, opens early, free wifi, good coffee, food and drinks if you need them for later 😉 There is music, and it is a cafe, so bear this in mind and wear head phones if you need them while you write.

Melbourne Central: Fourth Sunday of the month. We are nestled in the back corner of the upstairs food court near the windows, past the colourful piano, behind the big clock.

Not currently running: Writers of the South, let’s write: This is for southern Melbourne, down as far as the Clayton and Mentone area. Anyone can attend and join in and write your heart out (and have ice cream).

Not currently running: Writers Workshop: If you want to work through a piece, then come along to the Eltham Library and let us help you create your best work.

Not currently running: Treehouse Writing: Join us in Olinda for a sanctuary in the hills where we write and relax.

As with all our events, please get in touch if you would like to help with running events. The best way to do this is to come to one of our events and chat to the current event hosts about what you would like to do. We prefer to have two event hosts at each event, so where there is an opening we are happy for you to get involved.

There are many other Writing groups in Melbourne that you may be interested in as well. Go to them all and see what you like . . . but then come back to MWS and bring more great people with you. Haha 😉

Melbourne Writers Social

Melbourne, AU
5,754 Writers / Creatives

When joining, prepare yourself to attend one event per month. You can of course attend more often, but to ensure this group continues to offer diversity, all members attending…

Next Meetup

Monday 6.30-8pm we are online

Monday, Apr 5, 2021, 6:30 PM
1 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

More links below

7. All Write! upcoming events

OPEN AGAIN (however, we are checking if this location is still ok or if we need to change it slightly, stay tuned!): A place where you can write in Melbourne Central. All you do is turn up and write with others. You can chat to other writers as well if you like and grab a bite or a cuppa.

Most of all, enjoy yourself.

Melbourne Writers Social

Melbourne, AU
5,754 Writers / Creatives

When joining, prepare yourself to attend one event per month. You can of course attend more often, but to ensure this group continues to offer diversity, all members attending…

Next Meetup

Monday 6.30-8pm we are online

Monday, Apr 5, 2021, 6:30 PM
1 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

More links below

8. We want to hear from you!

Yes, we really do.

We want feedback in any way shape or form. Even if it is to tell us you love us.

Stuff you may wish to reply about for our next Writers Sauce:

1) A few sentences on what writing means to you.

2) A paragraph or two about how you became a writer (or want to).

3) A great skill you picked up regarding editing, writing, publishing, etc.

4) The best place to write.

5) How chatting to others about writing made you a better writer.

9. Join us and we’ll promote you

 You’re Not Alone

Come Take the Journey With Us

Become a Member for $20 per year

This is a collaborative group created so that in greater numbers we will be heard rather than forgotten

JOIN

Your $20 helps to pay for this website and member writers’ platforms

READ MORE

10. Essential Information

Sites Authors Should Know

This is an unofficial list I have created as a useful writer’s tool. I receive no royalties, or kickbacks from any sites below. Use as advice only.

-(Dean MacAllister)

SELFPUBLISHINGADVICE.ORG– Before submitting to a publisher or self-publishing I highly recommend you check out the ‘Writers Beware’ section of this site! It has lists of scams to look out for and lists the less-than-reputable companies that have ripped writers off globally. Learn from the mistakes of others.

Smashwords- Creates and publishes E-books in all formats for free.

Takes some getting used to and has to be done properly. For a small fee people on site will convert your file through the “meat-grinder” converter for you.

Kindlepreneur- Writer who joined most author sites to compare.

Links to the best author friendly tools. Marketing advice included. Free website with free manuals. (Highly recommended!)

Goodreads- Author/Reader site. Many discussion forums. Very popular. Good place to find fans, create an author profile and source reviews.

Librarything- Poor-man’s version of Goodreads, but much less commercial.

READ MORE HERE: www.worldwriterscollective.com/writers-sauce

11. Important Links

Post news about your writing, book launch, events, or event just a link to your latest blog/post/tweet: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1629658520414716

Important information about writing in general, and the Melbourne Writers Group: https://www.facebook.com/MelbWriters

Discuss anything you like that’s creative: https://www.facebook.com/groups/169777419779168

For people who want to discuss writing on a forum that is for everyone around the world: https://www.facebook.com/groups/570847673015529

Your work edited for free by other writers. Give feedback to other writers to gain more practice editing your own work: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/mx9e9m43ljweh11/AAD3I7-VKOT5XSL8As6k1UOxa?dl=0

Information on writing, writing competitions, professional editing, getting published, and more. Become a member for discounts: https://www.worldwriterscollective.com

Near Melbourne? Come to our group and meet other writers and chat. Everyone is welcome:https://www.meetup.com/Melbourne-Writers

Previous email-outs with great information.https://www.worldwriterscollective.com/writers-sauce

The Story Mint newsletter for even more information. Subscribe here:http://www.thestorymint.com

Writers Sauce – WWC

World Writers Collective

Interview with Mat Clarke, founder of The World Writer’s Collective

30 March 2021 Leave a comment

Mat Clarke is providing a place for new writers to learn, share, and get involved in a supportive community. The best part? Much of it is free, or costs only a nominal fee. Based in Melbourne, Australia, Clarke is creating an international destination for contests, editing, and writer promotion.

Full interview here: 

horrortree.com/interview-with-mat-clarke-founder-of-the-world-writers-collective

Categories: Writing Groups

Child Magical by Cecile Ravell

24 March 2021 Leave a comment

Just a little reminder about our friend Cecile Ravell’s forthcoming book launch:

Saturday March 27th

2 pm

Montmorency. (Not far from the station)

Child Magical is a very intimate story told from the perspective of a little girl, born in Brooklyn, New York, to refugees from Malta who wound up in Melbourne.

It’s a beautiful set of cameos, suitable for adults and children alike.

UNICEF and the UNHCR have featured her in their magazines and are filming an interview with Cecile.

You can check out Cecile’s other publications on her website. https://ravellc.wixsite.com/ravell-the-writer

If you’d like to come, please confirm via email magz.morgan@gmail.com or SMS on 0412 572 222 by Friday, the 25th March.

Pleased advise me if you wish to bring a friend.

Magz Morgan

https://www.magzmorgan.com

Categories: Writing Groups

What happens when someone has their writing plagiarised

17 March 2021 Leave a comment

At WWC we post up writer and author news from all over the world that we think you might like to read www.worldwriterscollective.com
Enter a free writing competition with free feedback from judges.

Q. What do you think about plagiarism?

Categories: Writing Groups

Riding around in cars with authors

17 February 2021 Leave a comment
Categories: Writing Groups

NEWS from World Writers Collective

7 January 2021 Leave a comment

From Michael Connelly to Heather Rose, the world’s best writers reveal the books that shaped them:

https://www.worldwriterscollective.com

#writers #books #publishing #author

Categories: Writing Groups

Important News and Events for Authors

20 December 2020 Leave a comment
Categories: Writing Groups

Writers Sauce – WWC – MWS 12-December-2020

12 December 2020 Leave a comment

Writers Sauce – WWC – MWS 12December-2020

Welcome to Writers Sauce. We have three new topics to read. See CONTENTS below.

Mimi is our newest subscriber. We now have 294 subscribers. You’ve joined a great group of writers 🙂

If anyone would like to invite friends to join us, just forward on this email to anyone anywhere in the world.

We need more members. You will have your own author profile page and special promotions.

https://www.worldwriterscollective.com/wwc

Do you want to add to this email with your own words of wisdom? Well, we want you to as well. Get in touch with anything you think writers want to know about. We can also/otherwise add info to our NEWS section on the WWC website.

It’s all free and it’s off our own backs’. Please get involved if you have the time.

Thank you,

Mat Clarke

www.worldwriterscollective.com/mat-carke

Contents:

(Look for the *NEW* stamp below for content you haven’t read yet)

*1. Book Review (more reviews on books wanted) *NEW*

*2. Writing competition *NEW*

3. Promote your blog

*4. Review of Authorpreneurship *NEW*

5. What is a genre?

*6. Melbourne Writers Social Group upcoming events *NEW*

*7. All Write! upcoming events *NEW*

8. We want to hear from you

9. Join us and we’ll promote you

10. Essential Information for Writers

11. Important links


1. Review a book title – It will be posted on the WWC website

READ MORE HERE: www.worldwriterscollective.com/writers-sauce

Are you someone who likes to review books (poems, short stories, movie scripts, blogs, non-fiction, etc.) and give honest feedback on content, interest, characters, structure, or if you think it was just really good reading? Submit your review via this email.

For2021 please review any book or script or poetry you like (yes, you can submit a review done on your story if you like).

Here’s a review by Magz Morgan of Cecile Ravell’s story: https://ravellc.wixsite.com/ravell-the-writer


‘Coming, Frankwen’. The voice of the three-year-old child calling to her brother and hero, opens Child Magical. Cecile Ravell’s story is a memoir of a childhood in transit, from Brooklyn, New York, to Malta then Melbourne, Australia. 

In a series of poignant and funny cameos, seen through the eyes of a little girl, Ravell brings to life an intimate immigrant tale. The vignettes follow this feisty little girl from moments of triumph, to moments of indignation, as she becomes aware of her position as an outsider in a society that values fair-haired children, and as a girl who plays second fiddle to a family culture that reveres boys.

Child Magical provides valuable insights into the reality of what it feels and looks like, for a girl, growing up; in particular, an immigrant girl.

Read it slowly, savour it in your favourite armchair, or read it quickly on public transport. Either way, Ravell’s story is a good read, piquant and thought-provoking.’

Magz Morgan, author, ‘Motherlands’.

www.magzmorgan.com

2. Current Writing Competition (FREE)

Short story competition – World Writers Collective

Top five to six winners are published in our anthology: https://www.worldwriterscollective.com

A WORLD OF RUSH or anything about rushing – Write 5000 words with this theme in mind.

Become a World Writers Collective member, which helps support everyone in the group as indie writers and allows you to collect prizes if you win.

Want to get published or publish your own works and have our members spread the word about your works, book launch, or other? It’s only $20 a year to join which helps pay the few hundred dollars it costs for the domain and host the website each year.

www.worldwriterscollective.com/writing-competitions

If you are one of the top winners of the competition, you will be included in the 2021 anthology. That’s just one of the great reasons to get involved with the anthology!

We also want to promote you. All you have to do is say the word. 

3. Promote your blog

We want to promote your blog. Email us a link of one of your blogs and an explanation of why WWC people would enjoy reading it.

Here’s one from Mat Clarke:

https://matclarke.blogspot.com/2019/12/roadside-thriller-story.html

It’s an interesting short thriller story written and performed as a podcast by Mat Clarke and directed and produced by Noel Anderson.

4. Review of Authorpreneurship

Becoming an Authorpreneur

Review of Authorpreneurship: The business of creativity by Hazel Edwards 2012

Keesing Press Australian Society of Authors.

Hazel Edwards has published 200 titles of children’s books in Australia. This book tells us that as authors we have to be both a creative writer and an entrepreneur small business person, marketing and selling our book. These days, this applies to both commercially published authors and self published authors.

She strongly recommends using the Australian Society of Authors (ASA), Australia’s professional authors’ organization. It has superb advice on its website and through its advisers, who are successful professionals themselves.

ASA publishes professional speaking rates for authors. So if you approach a school principal for example, you can say ‘I charge the ASA rate of…’ for your talk. That has professional gravitas.

She also provides superb tips for your speaking and book talks. A Question and Answer session is essential. It’s often the most popular section of the talk. People also love to hear about the stages of writing your book. As well, they also love a bit of humour.

She advises having a ‘killer’ question or two pre-prepared in case the audience is shy. For example I’m publishing my professional standard spiritual self help book early next year with Ingram Spark. I’ll have a ‘killer’ pre-prepared question along these lines. “ My book is called Finding Spiritual Strength. Stories from the front-line of life. Loving values and practices from across the humanitarian and spiritual traditions. I often get asked, ‘what do you define as spiritual, Jim?’ My answer is, for me, spiritual is simply love. If I meet someone I experience as more loving than me, I see them as more spiritually developed than I am. That’s regardless of their beliefs, whether atheist, agnostic, spiritual or religious.’”

I highly recommend her book. I read it along with 6 other book business advice books and they transformed my understanding of the industry. I’ll review some more at other meetings.

Jim Pletch

READ MOR

5. What is a genre?

From the mind of Mat Clarke.

What is Genre Writing?

Is ’email writing’ a particular genre? If so, then that could mean blogging would be too, right?

Do you find that you often question what genre it is you’re writing and if you can classify yourself as a particular genre writer?

Do you think you’re keeping to the required norms of writing.

Do you mix your writing so it’s part comedy, part romance, part nonfiction and part suspense?

I promise this next question coming up is going to be the last stressy thing about genres. I just hope I haven’t made you want to put these thoughts into the too-hard-basket.

Don’t give up and throw your pen and paper in to the bin and smash your laptop with a hammer. I’m going to help you through this and I promise there’s a rainbow at the end.

Will readers stop reading your stories if you don’t stick to one particular genre while keeping within the standard conventions of that particular genre so your readers know what they are buying each time they pick up your book?

The short answer to that last question is, no, not anymore. This was the convention in the past, but you can now freely write more than one genre as well as mix genres and dabble in sub genres.

If you decide you want to traditionally publish, you’ll need to read the instructions from the agent’s or publisher’s website before you submit. There are many hoops you’ll need to jump through and much information they will want from you. This includes writing a synopsis, classifying your work into a genre, mentioning what authors and titles are close to yours in style or plot or other, and you’ll need to write up general information about you as a writer.

When I first started writing, I did so for fun. I was ten years old and all I wanted to do was write what was entertaining to me.

Is fun a genre?

I didn’t need anyone to read my stories. Instead I enjoyed creating new worlds where I could insert people and creatures into them to explore, create, conflict and interact.

Then came the idea of one day being published. Don’t get me wrong, it was lots of fun writing and not needing to edit. I still enjoy sitting down not knowing how a story will play out. It was just that in 2010 I decided I wanted other people to read my work and for them to actually enjoy it. To do this I needed not only to amuse myself, but to work out what my readers liked too. I also needed to learn how to edit properly. (With both of these, you never stop learning.)

After writing over 70,000 words of my first novel, I decided I needed to explore what genre my story might fit into. I did this by comparing my story to other stories already available from other known authors. I made notes on how my story matched a proposed genre before knowing it was definitely that. I wrote a synopsis and a blurb and compared mine to other published authors to help cement my work and what it was similar to.

I initially thought my writing was general fiction. I shouldn’t have been so boring. I later thought adventure, due to the journey aspect that my main characters often would take. However, I still wasn’t sure. I kept digging and was about to settle on crime (because I often include murder/crime that would be investigated by police), but then I discovered the thriller genre.

Thrillers are often fast paced, have a character that is either pursuing or being pursued and has police investigations, although as a secondary aspect.This fit my general story writing style. Huzzah! I could now call myself a thriller writer.

Enter sub-genres from stage left.

You don’t have to constrain yourself to a particular genre. There are mixed genres and subgenres that allow you to write whatever you like. Yes, your story needs to have a plot, have interesting characters and be edited well, but as for genre, you’re allowed to call yourself a thriller-adventure writer. A romance-comedy writer. A psychological thriller writer. Create your own and be proud to be a comedy-crime writer.

I write blogs and email.

Yes, you can write blogs or emails in a certain specified way, and that could then make it a particular genre. Maybe your job has conformity when writing emails. This is a genre. You write your blog in a comedic way. Guess what, genre writing!

So what does the word genre mean? A class or category having particular form, technique or content.

This is the dictionary definition and really sums it up well. I don’t think we need to dwell on that any further.

I write many different genres. Or I want to try other genres.

Yes, yes, yes! You should.

In years past publishers wanted to be able to classify you as a particular genre writer so they could market you in a certain way.

Then, if you wanted to stray from your specified genre, you would need to have a serious talk with your publisher and maybe even search for a new publisher.

Marketing you is as essential as marketing your book. It’s just that now the marketing angle has changed slightly so it doesn’t have to be all about what genre you write. It can instead be about the interesting stories you bring into the world. It was a subtle change that the readers themselves brought about, and it’s an important one.

As for me, I recently wrote a crime novel even though I am a thriller writer. And that’s ok. I’m trying to offload it onto a publisher as we speak. I’ve also written children’s stories, young adult and adventure.

Now you should go and explore all the genres out there and have fun! Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t write what you want to write (just keep in mind that when a story can be classified more easily into a particular genre, publishers are more interested in publishing your work – new authors only. Established and already published authors have much more freedom).

6. Melbourne Writers Social upcoming events

During the virus outbreak we suspended some of our events, with most returning January 2021. Our monthly Tuesday event is now running again at the Wharf Hotel. Please join us – all are welcome even if you are only thinking of starting out in a creative field.

We meet online every Monday from 6.30pm and show each other our work and chat about everything creative.  https://www.meetup.com/Melbourne-Writers/ Details are on the Meetup.com site.

The following events are on hold.

Returning January 2021. South Bank Write Now: Second Saturday of the month. The venue is generally quiet, opens early, free wifi, good coffee, food and drinks if you need them for later 😉 There is music, and it is a cafe, so bear this in mind and wear head phones if you need them while you write.

Writers of the South, let’s write: This is for southern Melbourne, down as far as the Clayton and Mentone area. Anyone can attend and join in and write your heart out (and have ice cream).

Writers Workshop: If you want to work through a piece, then come along to the Eltham Library and let us help you create your best work.

Treehouse Writing: Join us in Olinda for a sanctuary in the hills where we write and relax.

As with all our events, please get in touch if you would like to help with running events. The best way to do this is to come to one of our events and chat to the current event hosts about what you would like to do. We prefer to have two event hosts at each event, so where there is an opening we are happy for you to get involved.

There are many other Writing groups in Melbourne that you may be interested in as well. Go to them all and see what you like . . . but then come back to MWS and bring more great people with you. Haha 😉

Melbourne Writers Social

Melbourne, AU
5,631 Writers / Creatives

When joining, prepare yourself to attend one event per month. You can of course attend more often, but to ensure this group continues to offer diversity, all members attending…

Next Meetup

All Write!

Sunday, Dec 13, 2020, 1:00 PM
12 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

More links below

7. All Write! upcoming events

OPEN AGAIN (however, we are checking if this location is still ok or if we need to change it slightly, stay tuned!): A place where you can write in Melbourne Central. All you do is turn up and write with others. You can chat to other writers as well if you like and grab a bite or a cuppa.

Most of all, enjoy yourself.

Melbourne Writers Social

Melbourne, AU
5,631 Writers / Creatives

When joining, prepare yourself to attend one event per month. You can of course attend more often, but to ensure this group continues to offer diversity, all members attending…

Next Meetup

All Write!

Sunday, Dec 13, 2020, 1:00 PM
12 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

More links below

8. We want to hear from you!

Yes, we really do.

We want feedback in any way shape or form. Even if it is to tell us you love us.

Stuff you may wish to reply about for our next Writers Sauce:

1) A few sentences on what writing means to you.

2) A paragraph or two about how you became a writer (or want to).

3) A great skill you picked up regarding editing, writing, publishing, etc.

4) The best place to write.

5) How chatting to others about writing made you a better writer.

9. Join us and we’ll promote you

 You’re Not Alone

Come Take the Journey With Us

Become a Member for $20 per year

This is a collaborative group created so that in greater numbers we will be heard rather than forgotten

JOIN

Your $20 helps to pay for this website and member writers’ platforms

READ MORE

10. Essential Information

Sites Authors Should Know

This is an unofficial list I have created as a useful writer’s tool. I receive no royalties, or kickbacks from any sites below. Use as advice only.

-(Dean MacAllister)

SELFPUBLISHINGADVICE.ORG– Before submitting to a publisher or self-publishing I highly recommend you check out the ‘Writers Beware’ section of this site! It has lists of scams to look out for and lists the less-than-reputable companies that have ripped writers off globally. Learn from the mistakes of others.

Smashwords- Creates and publishes E-books in all formats for free.

Takes some getting used to and has to be done properly. For a small fee people on site will convert your file through the “meat-grinder” converter for you.

Kindlepreneur- Writer who joined most author sites to compare.

Links to the best author friendly tools. Marketing advice included. Free website with free manuals. (Highly recommended!)

Goodreads- Author/Reader site. Many discussion forums. Very popular. Good place to find fans, create an author profile and source reviews.

Librarything- Poor-man’s version of Goodreads, but much less commercial.

READ MORE HERE: www.worldwriterscollective.com/writers-sauce

11. Important Links

Post news about your writing, book launch, events, or event just a link to your latest blog/post/tweet: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1629658520414716

Important information about writing in general, and the Melbourne Writers Group: https://www.facebook.com/MelbWriters

Discuss anything you like that’s creative: https://www.facebook.com/groups/169777419779168

For people who want to discuss writing on a forum that is for everyone around the world: https://www.facebook.com/groups/570847673015529

Your work edited for free by other writers. Give feedback to other writers to gain more practice editing your own work: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/mx9e9m43ljweh11/AAD3I7-VKOT5XSL8As6k1UOxa?dl=0

Information on writing, writing competitions, professional editing, getting published, and more. Become a member for discounts: https://www.worldwriterscollective.com

Near Melbourne? Come to our group and meet other writers and chat. Everyone is welcome:https://www.meetup.com/Melbourne-Writers

Previous email-outs with great information.https://www.worldwriterscollective.com/writers-sauce

The Story Mint newsletter for even more information. Subscribe here:http://www.thestorymint.com

Writers Sauce – WWC

World Writers Collective

Categories: Writing Groups Tags: ,

Publishing Writers Starts Now

27 November 2020 Leave a comment

 Join our free writing contest with free feedback and you’ll be published within our next anthology.

Nothing could be simpler than that!

Support your writing group by writing and chatting about writing 🙂

#writing #publishing #authors

https://www.worldwriterscollective.com/shortstory-competitions

Categories: Writing Groups
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